About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4
and that cities are key to the economy. large cities produce 83% of economic output in the united states. the 30 largest cities in the u.s. account for half of all gdp. we're all in favor of good infrastructure until it comes time to pay for it. you say that some money can come from the private sector, we've had high-profile examples of public-private partnerships that have gone wrong. how do city governments make sure that city residents get what they pay for? >> i don't think there's any simple answer to this. one reason we might want a national infrastructure bank is not for the money, but to provide oversight, you have somebody to go to when you have a project, a regulator. an interlocutor. we should alloy private money. there's an additional problem. about so-called eminent domain. you can't just clear things out in china they used to at least just knock on your door and say you're moving. we're building a road here. you got to move out of your apartment tomorrow. we can't do that. it makes it trickier in our older cities to rebuild in the way they did in china. >> it's an interesting analo
you some of the figures. large cities produce 83% of economic output in the united states. the 30 largest cities in the u.s. account for half of all gdp. now, we're all in favor of good infrastructure until it comes time to pay for it. you say that some money can come from the private sector, but we've had some high-profile examples of public/private partnerships that have gone wrong. how do city governments make sure that city residents get what they pay for? >> i don't think there's any simple answer to this. and by the way, one reason when he we might want a national infrastructure bank is not for the money but just to provide oversight and ombudsman so that you have somebody to go to when off project or regulator, an interlocutor perhaps. we should definitely allow private money. there is an additional problem, and richard probably knows more about this, about so-called eminent domain, where you can't just clear things out. in china, they used to at least just knock on your door and say you're moving, we're building here a road here. you have to move out of your parm tomorrow.
for being had largely disappeared. if you think about every one of america's older, colder cities, they were all part of solving a transportation problem. they were all nodes on a transportation network. if you go back to 1816, we as americans sat on the edge of an enormously wealthy continent that was virtually inaccessible. in 1816 it cost as much to move goods 30 miles over land as it did to ship them across the entire atlantic ocean. it was so expensive to get goods in. over the course of the 19th century, we've built an amazing network. we built canals like the erie and illinois and michigan canals, railroads atticaals, and cities grew up. at buffalo, the western terminus of the erie canal. the oldest cities were typically where the river meets the sea, like boston and new york, but every one of america's 20 largest cities was on a major waterway. chicago was a future that was made it the linchpin of a watery arc that went from new york to new orleans. and industries grew up around these transportation hubs. chicago's most famous is, of course, its stockyards, and that's what you're loo
. there was a sharia court in the city. these are basically consider it. >> civilian councils are trying. civilian councils are trying to wrestle more and more control from the fsa. the relationship as cooperative. in large depends on whether or not it meet that. i was able to meet with the commanders. i met with the supporters. not 10[inaudible] are either criminals gangs trying to take care of the chaos or the small extreme group that is well funded. majority are severly under funded. i met to the brigade commander with not enough food to go around. there's also that aspect but who is funded and who is not. they're trying to portray themselves as the ones that are leading the fighting in aleppo. they immediately rejected the coalition. this was reported. i got in touch with the commanders. the main fighting group in a lot of but of a video. they do not represent us. they said we recognize the council. i think of them as moderates. even their experience and food shortages. this is very well funded. this logic depends on whether 0% can receive reports. >> right now and maybe the case that people i
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4